Moving Stones

Moving Stones

The Neolithic heritage of Anatolia is to be recorded and showcased to an international audience.
The project “Moving Stones: The Neolithic Anatolia Project in Europe”, led by the French Institute for Anatolian Studies in Istanbul, is being launched in the context of the EU-Turkey Intercultural Dialogue Project by the Yunus Emre Institute.

The press conference of the project was held at the French Cultural Centre of Istanbul on 19 September 2019. At this event, the planned documentary was heralded by a number of important guests, including the Yunus Emre Institute President, Prof. Dr. Şeref Ateş, Head of the Delegation of the European Union to Turkey@sDepartment of Fundamental Rights, Judicial and Internal Affairs, Alexander Fricke, and the Director of the Istanbul French Institute for Anatolian Studies, Bayram Balcı.  Also participating were the project team, academic advisory board members, the documentary shooting team, archaeologists and other distinguished guests.

“The bond between people.”

Speaking at the press conference of the project, the Yunus Emre Institute President Prof. Dr. Şeref Ateş touched on the importance of people communicating with each other through the architecture and archaeological data we produce. He said they would work together as an Institute to complete the project and contribute to the establishment of ties between Turkey and the world.

Moving Stones

The Moving Stones project aims to raise awareness of the community’s archaeological assets in Turkey, while the documentary film will be shot to record Anatolia’s Neolithic heritage and make it visible all over the world. The film will include coverage of various Neolithic excavations, including the new Göbeklitepe site.  The project, and its documentary film, is expected to be completed by the end of 2020.

 

Enis Riza is the director of the documentary film, with Nalan Gumizli as the production director, and Jale Mekiş Diker coordinating the field photo shoots.  The film intends to record archaeological excavations and collections in museums investigating the first settlements of humanity, from Hasankeyf to Kırklareli, all with the permission of the Ministry of Culture and Tourism of the Republic of Turkey.